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Dr Andrew Holman talks about Fibromyalgia

Dr Holman has been researching treatment options for fibromyalgia for many years and been instrumental in bringing these for approval in the States.  Unfortunately the drugs have not been approved specifically for fibromyalgia in Europe, but the findings from these studies helps in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in producing the symptoms of fibromyalgia.

We are very fortunate to have Andrew researching into fibromyalgia and for giving freely of his time whilst in the UK to update us on current thinking.  This is an opportunity not to be missed.

Tickets can be purchased through the website shop at £3 each to include tea/coffee and the receipt should be brought as proof of purchase as no actual ticket will be issued.  Places are limited, so please book in advance to avoid any possible disappointment. You can order your tickets here.

For details of venue please go to http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/denmarkhill/index.aspx

There is good disabled access and the main car park which is opposite the Weston Education Centre will be available by buzzing in and mentioning fibromyalgia.


Andrew J. Holman MD, is Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington and practices rheumatology at Valley Medical Center in a Seattle suburb. He completed his undergraduate studies at Bowdoin College in 1981 and received his medical degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1987. His internal medicine residency training was completed at Denver Presbyterian Medical Center in 1990. After his rheumatology fellowship at the University of Washington, he has practiced clinical rheumatology while exploring new options for fibromyalgia and autoimmune connective tissue diseases. His research focuses on autonomic dysregulation, hypermobility syndrome and how the autonomic nervous system interacts with the immune system.

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