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@AberdeenEpi Hope you have a great weekend whatever you are up to, Gary! 🙌🏽

Articles

Dr Andrew Holman - Kings College Hosp 21 Jul 12

At the talk at The Weston Education Centre in Kings College Hospital London we had 60 attendees, who were all enthused by the information given.

After explaining the history of fibromyalgia research and the information gained about the symptoms and various medications, he went on to his research regarding cord compression.

He had found, through help with radiologists, that problems with obstruction of the spinal channel in the neck can lead to wide spread pain and overexcitement leading to sleep problems.  When scan results are presented in a normal positioning the compression is not evident, but when flexed or extended the problem is clear to see. This positional cord compression is abbreviated to PC3. The website www.PositionalCordCompression.com shows this clearly and has a more detailed explanation.  This site also explains that, “PC3 is not the same as FM, but can activate the autonomic nervous system to aggravate FM and also mimic FM by inducing widespread pain.”

There are ways to help with this problem and Dr Holman’s associate has developed a series of treatment exercises that can help.  The majority of cases find relief through these, but for some surgery is required.  The treatment is shown in a dvd that Dr Holman was able to give out to a few people at his talks.  FMA UK has a copy and is looking at the best way to make these available.

Although the treatment looks as though it could be given by physiotherapists, the diagnosis is more problematic.  The three MRI scans required are not readily available and need specialist adaptations to be carried out.  Dr Holman has stated that without these any data collected about success of the treatment would not be valid and is reluctant to advise the treatment be tried without a clear diagnosis.

He is willing to speak to anyone that contacts him at his Seattle clinic  AJHSeattle@ aol.com.  We understand that there are hopes of getting diagnosis and treatment in the UK, but nothing is in place at present.

Dr Holman has offered to present any progress next year in the UK and we will be in contact with him to arrange this.

Our thanks also go to Dan Austen for his support in making this possible, Natalie Shepherd for arranging the venue and our other volunteers that helped with the organisation on the day.

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